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Subtitles

January 6, 2015 to January 31, 2015

Artists:

Images:

Subtitles installation
'Subtitles' (#1) opposite/opposite
'Subtitles' (#1) opposite/opposite
'Subtitles' (#2) terminal/self
'Subtitles' (#2) terminal/self
'Subtitles' (#3) mystic/comma
'Subtitles' (#3) mystic/comma
'Subtitles' (#4) north/madly
'Subtitles' (#4) north/madly
'Subtitles' (#5) no/idea
'Subtitles' (#5) no/idea
'Subtitles' (#6) vanquish/blueberries
'Subtitles' (#6) vanquish/blueberries
'Subtitles' (#7) wrong/hostess
'Subtitles' (#7) wrong/hostess
'Subtitles' (#8) hello/diagnosis
'Subtitles' (#8) hello/diagnosis
'Subtitles' (#9) five/explained
'Subtitles' (#9) five/explained
'Subtitles' (#10) nice/triumph
'Subtitles' (#10) nice/triumph
'Subtitles' (#11) forefinger/wonder
'Subtitles' (#11) forefinger/wonder
'Subtitles' (#12) king/fool
'Subtitles' (#12) king/fool
'Subtitles' (#13) hire/oracle
'Subtitles' (#13) hire/oracle
'Subtitles' (#14) perfect/joke
'Subtitles' (#14) perfect/joke
'Subtitles' (#21) universe/called
'Subtitles' (#21) universe/called
'Subtitles' (#32) please/happen
'Subtitles' (#32) please/happen
'Subtitles' (#42) seven/bending
'Subtitles' (#42) seven/bending
'Subtitles' (#98) no/words
'Subtitles' (#98) no/words
The 'Subtitles' print series includes one hundred individual prints in a varied edition of four. Contact the gallery to see the full series.
'Subtitles' (#1) opposite/opposite - IN PROGRESS
Statement: 

In her new work “Subtitles", Victoria Haven presents a monumental series of 100 individual text-based prints. The prints have been constructed using a combination of technologies spanning the historic (woodblock) and the contemporary (laser etching). The work will be installed in a grid that will wrap around the interior walls of the gallery, demanding the viewer enter a void-like state where the possibilities of language are questioned.

The work has its genesis in the most contemporary of language technologies: Haven harvested thousands of words from personal text conversations in the form of two lists. Then she employed a computer algorithm program, the sole purpose of which was to create a continuous random pairing of the words. These binaries are the core material of the work called “Subtitles.” Through the process of printing, the digitally generated words materialize into tactile (inked and embossed paper), physical form.